DONORS

DURATION
May 2015 to October 2017
LOCATION
Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia and Yemen
BENEFICIARIES
Governmental institutions, non-Governmental organisations and migrant communities in the target countries
CONTEXT

Demographic and socio-economic trends as well as conflict are among the multitude of factors that continue to influence migration dynamics in the Middle East and North Africa. Every year, a significant number of people decide to leave their countries of origin in search of security and better opportunities. They migrate via sub-routes to Egypt for onward journey to Europe. While migrants regard Egypt as a transit country at the outset, many become stranded when initial resources are depleted. Transit migrants live a highly marginalized existence with limited access to employment and livelihood opportunities, healthcare assistance and access to other basic services. While migrants in Egypt are entitled to access preventive, primary and emergency health-care, many refrain from using respective services due to a number of factors such as lack of knowledge thereof, fear of arrest and expulsion, cultural barriers among others. With limited access to health care, they can be faced with serious health problems, including maternal and reproductive. Without immediate interventions morbidity and mortality among migrants can increase significantly.


OVERVIEW

Improving migrants’ access to health care and promoting their well-being is to uphold a basic human right that is also in the best interest of all countries and communities. Therefore, the project aims at contributing to improved health and well-being amongst migrants transiting through Morocco, Egypt, Tunisia, Yemen and Libya. Specifically, it is expected that: 1) stranded migrants receive medical assistance, treatment and/or medication; 2) stranded migrants are aware of available health care (including psychosocial support) and health issues of concern; 3) national authorities respond better to the health needs in migrant-dense areas; 4) governmental and non-governmental health structures deliver quality, “migrant-friendly” and “psychosocially aware” health care services; 5) extreme vulnerable cases, including victims of trafficking (VoTs), women migrants, single mothers and unaccompanied migrant children (UMCs), receive assistance from civil society.


EXPECTED RESULTS
  • Improved health and wellbeing of migrants;
  • National authorities have better policies responding to the health needs of migrants and their host communities in migrant-dense areas;
  • Health structures deliver quality, “migrant-friendly” and “psychosocially aware” health care services;
  • Migrants are aware of available health care (including psychosocial support) and health issues of concern;
  • Extreme vulnerable cases, including victims of trafficking (VoTs), women migrants, single mothers and unaccompanied migrant children (UMCs), receive assistance from civil society;
  • Good practices are shared among the five participating countries.

LINKS TO BROADER NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL COMMITMENTS
  • MoHP White Paper – Principle 1: “To improve the health of the entire population. Improving health is an intrinsic goal in itself but is also an important pathway to supporting poverty reduction and the socio‐economic development of Egypt”. 
  • Valletta Action Plan (2015), Priority initiative 1.1C: “Support resilience, in particular to the benefit of the most vulnerable, in particular women and children, and communities hosting protracted refugee populations, including through rural development, food and nutrition security, health, education and social protection“.
  • Sustainable Development Goals - Target 3.8: “Achieve universal health coverage, including financial risk protection, access to quality essential health-care services and access to safe, effective, quality and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all”.
  • Colombo Statement (2017): “We reaffirm that the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical, mental, and social well-being is a fundamental right of every human being, including migrants, regardless of their migratory status, and we recall all international instruments that recognize the rights of migrants